We are currently living through possibly the biggest disaster that the human race has ever had to face - and it is affecting everyone, all over the world. 
 
The worries and concerns that have arisen out of Covid 19 are many and varied - including the death of loved ones, illness, financial difficulties, isolation, boredom, lack of freedom, home schooling and more. 
 
We have all had to adapt to a completely new way of living with social distancing becoming the norm - a term that most of us had not even heard of a few months ago. 
 
The speed that this virus has spread is frightening and the consequences of it are far reaching. One thing is for certain - when we come though the other side there will be some changes to the way we live our lives. 
 
So, I thought this was an appropriate time to mention the quote at the beginning of this blog by Einstein. 
 
“In the midst of difficulties, opportunities exist” 
 
Let me clear up something right from the start - this isn’t an exploitative type of opportunities, well, at least not the way I see it. Just that, even in the worst of times, we can find good things to celebrate, including the NHS as we applaud them, and seize the opportunity to take our mind off the sadness of it and do any number of things. This could be spending quality time with the family, finding new games to play, learning a new language or skill (perhaps picking up that instrument that lays in the cupboard forgotten about), spring clean your home or get the garden looking better than it has in years. 
 
 
When this is over, we will be left with a greater appreciation of our friends, family and loved ones, many of whom we have not been able to hug, and share that human contact with for so long. Many people will spend more time working at home (even when we can go back to work in the offices) - in fact I predict that working from home will increase dramatically and most of us will be doing this at least a few days a week. We will have all become better at finding things to do when we are bored - many of us will have learned a new skill while we have been furloughed (even if it is just learning to use Zoom or any of the other video conferencing programmes that allow us to speak to people far away). Never again will we take for granted teachers, our freedom, our countryside, our NHS and the simple pleasures of going to the park and meeting with friends. 
 
 
The questions is - what can you achieve during this difficult time? What lessons can be learnt? What will you say to your kids when you talk about this in ten years from now - what opportunities did you see? 
 
As Charles Darwin discovered, “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change”. 
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